Wednesday, 14 September 2016

Poetry Thursday 229 - Wheels within wheels #falkirkwheel


I visited Falkirk a few days ago with the express purpose of visiting the wheel there. It wasn't because I am an engineer but rather influenced by the marriage of art and engineering.

Falkirk Wheel

The Falkirk Wheel is a great big wheel,
designed to lift the narrow boat,
from the Forth & Clyde to the Union side,
then on to the city it’ll float.

The Wheel is lonely in the world,
none other of its type exists.
A masterpiece of engineering unfurled,
by our Queen in her Golden gift.

The Wheel was planned in the nineties,
to replace ancient eleven rise locks,
to move the narrow boat in the noughties,
from zero to twenty five blocks.

The Wheel is silent in motion,
in spite of the mass it lifts,
as gentle as baby lotion,
but no rocking for those it shifts.

The Falkirk Wheel is a great big wheel,
designed to lift the narrow boat,
from the Forth & Clyde to the Union side,
then on to the city it’ll float.
© David L Atkinson September 2016


The following effort was inspired by the style that Roald Dahl as well as others have used to produce a narrative in poetic form. I remember a 1950/60s advert for hand washing and germ prevention about  a girl 'Poor Gertie'. The poem was by Cyril Fletcher who narrated the advert on hygiene. You will notice that the poem below is linked to that above which was not my original intention but seemed to be too good an opportunity to miss.



Image result for square wheels



Square Wheels

You could say that it all began
when corners were knocked off by a man,
who was fed up of bouncing along the road
in a cart sporting squares, in which he rode.
His ageing horse was equally pleased
at the novel change and he agreed
when his master bragged about what he’d done
cos’ it allowed the old beast to run and run.
The idea caught on pretty quick
with his neighbours and in a tick
the whole town was making rapid strides
in the surrounding country sides.
The naysayers claimed it would never catch on
and persisted with squares to bounce along,
but those with foresight began to see
other uses that would set them free.

Making holes and lifting things
were easier, that’s what rounds bring.
And so narrow boats from mast to keel,
could be lifted by the Falkirk Wheel.
© David L Atkinson September 2016







God Bless